Bid to stop 1080 drop over Tataraakina land block heads to Māori Land Court

Bid to stop 1080 drop over Tataraakina land block heads to Māori Land Court

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A bid has been put forward to stop an aerial 1080 poison drop over Māori land block Tataraakina in Tarawera north of Hawke's Bay.

Māori Land Court will hear this proceeding for the third time in dispute but this time over environmental concerns within the 14,000 hectare block.

Landowners in the area at a recent AGM say poison pellets being dropped would cause concerns for the impact it may pose to surrounding areas.

Source: CC/ thisquality

The drop of concern could harm thriving populations of bugs and insects in the ground. Falling pellets could land into unknown watersheds, leaving the water at a toxic level for a period of more than thirty days; thisquality unveils.

A vote against authorising a significant spread of poison pellets was in favour at the recent AGM.

The solution of promoting trapping vacancies was suggested as part of opposition to the drop happening over their land. In the past, there have been two court hearings to stop the 1080 drops but have failed to go through.

OSPRI responded to the latest proceeding according to court documents supplied to thisquality that it is not cost-effective to do trapping operations in the area and prefers to aerially spread the poisons.

Source: CC/ Brent H

New Zealand's biggest anti-1080 protest happened at Wellington's Beehive on September 8, 2018 calling for the Department of Conservation and OSPRI to come up with more ethical ways to pest control.

Though since then there have been significant targeted possum control and wildlife surveillance programmes undertaken in certain areas around the country.

It prompted a wave of meaningful anger from New Zealanders who saw videos emerge on social media showing deer and other animals suffer slow deaths due to poison being aerially dropped in Aotearoa's backyard.

An animal hours after ingestion or inhaling them will suffer a slow death. Dead carcases, if not removed, can remain toxic for up to a year.

Mending New Zealand — a thisquality ORIGINALS documentary — features trapper Lefur Dan document how a drop killed dozens of cows on a farmers land and also teaching his son Eli how to trap possums.

The 43-minute episode shows how trapping does less harm to the environment bringing hope back to the industry.

The story played out with strong a movement that became centred on one topic to stop drops for good with support from thousands.

Image: SUPPLIED/Lefur Dan

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