EXPLORING: Mangaone Walkway

EXPLORING: Mangaone Walkway

The southern portion of the track follows the Waikanae River through Kaitawa Scenic Reserve, which secures. Recently processed podocarp timberland in the south and crosses farmland (following a homestead street) at its north end.

Streams at the southern end are generally simple to the passage, however, hope to get wet feet. The Wellington Botanical society portrays the Kaitawa Reserve as a critical remainder of the first beachfront wetland environment, a lot of which has been lost.

The best car park is on Mangaone South Road. At Waikanae, traffic lights take the course inland towards the Akatarawas, killing to Reikorangi about 7km not far off. Passing Reikorangi Pottery, two or three hundred meters down Ngatiawa Road take a left on Mangaone South Road and drive as far as possible and park in the car park.

For Mangaone North, turn inland at Te Horo junction 9km north of Waikanae. Go past the school and follow.

The signs to Mangaone Walkway along Hautere-Cross Road, at that point, take a rig

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EXPLORING: The Forgotten Arcus Dam

EXPLORING: The Forgotten Arcus Dam

The Arcus dam was built in the early 1990s (1993 – 1998) by Charles Arcus & Brian Brassell. The Dam was abandoned due to it being built out too far from the cross lines of the Otaki catchment. The Dam is located off the grid, around 550-600m from Otaki Gorge road inland;

The Power House, that was also intended to be built on the Pukeatua Stream. Unfortunately, everything changed when a massive slip had blocked the stream after a wild storm; causing the lake to burst and flood the bed of the stream with rocks destroying the Power House.

Due to new track renovations, the hike to get to the Dam is a lot quicker with just over an hour’s worth of walking that was two hours previously. The track is being maintained by the Campbell family (David & Kathleen) that is now privately owned after the passing of Charlie Arcus (1920-1999) The land was put up for sale in 2000 from a Bank Mortgagee; it is now owned by the Deborah Charitable Trust also.

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