High rise with crime in Otaki since Coronavirus lockdown

High rise with crime in Otaki since Coronavirus lockdown

Last Updated:

Do you have a story? send newstips to [email protected]

Credit, Source: /Pixabay


Want your ad here? Advertise with thisquality
Advertisement Advertisement
Want your ad here? Advertise with thisquality

Since the Coronavirus lockdown, that took place on the 25th of March 2020, announced by Jacinda Ardern after closing schools the day beforehand due to Coronavirus cases rising fast. 

Crime in multiple locations around New Zealand is rising due to the significant restrictions that the New Zealand Government enforced.

In Otaki, a lot of people on social media had announced they had been burgled, robbed or attempted to be stolen within the first six days after tensions rise during the Coronavirus level 4 lockdown.

The level 4 lockdown is in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to communities around New Zealand, halting small businesses, large and every non-essential service including The Warehouse. 

Credit, Source: /

Mahinaarangi Baker

Want your ad here? Advertise with thisquality
Advertisement Advertisement
Want your ad here? Advertise with thisquality



On the 30th of March 2020,

Mahinaarangi Baker

 from a local Otaki Facebook group posted:

“Hey guys, Just a heads up, our car, a grey Toyota Wish [Number plate blanked], was stolen last night from 

Want your ad here? Advertise with thisquality
Advertisement Advertisement
Want your ad here? Advertise with thisquality

inside our gated property on Mahoe Street (Ōtaki Beach).” 

“Keep a lookout for it for us, and keep an eye on your property too.” 

Also, let’s not let low behaviour bring us down at this time, but keep looking out for one another.”

Charlotte Graham

from a local Otaki Facebook group also posted:

“Forgive me if this is old news now… last night there were a few burglaries around Otaki beach, Ngaio, Mahoe st that I know of.” 

“I awoke to a torch being shined around my windows. I think my wheelbarrow was tipped over.” 

“People and animals are keeping a lookout… nobody wants a hurt bottom, so please keep your self to yourself. Thank you.”

“Only the businesses essential to ensure the necessities of life, like supermarkets and pharmacies, can stay open. If in doubt, the business premises should be closed,” said Paul Stocks, deputy CEO at MBIE, in a statement on Tuesday evening.

“So, unfortunately, the Warehouse needs to close its shops. Leaving them open to the general public creates too high a risk of further spreading the virus.”

Stocks said “big box” retailers like Bunnings, Placemakers and Mitre 10 can stay open to trade customers for essential purposes only.

“These retailers play an important part in the construction supply chain, but they cannot sell goods to the general public.”

Businesses that are a critical part of the supply chain for essential services are also able to continue operating but must do so in a safe way.

“For example, if you make chemicals that are needed for our wastewater plants, then we need you to keep operating at the minimum level required.”

Dairies can continue to operate but must observe strict physical distancing rules for customers.

“Dairies provide essential food items like bread and milk to people close to where they live, especially the elderly who may not be able to get to a supermarket. However, they will need to operate a strict ‘one-in-one-out’ policy, and they won’t be allowed to sell food prepared on the premises.

“If any dairy breaks the rules, we will shut it down. If there is evidence of systemic abuse, we will remove them from the list of the essential services.

“Food delivery services like Uber Eats and Deliver Easy pose a risk to human health. We cannot guarantee every kitchen operates strict food preparation controls or that everyone who works in a kitchen is well. Evidence overseas suggests the virus has been spread via poor food hygiene practices, so it’s a real risk we have to eliminate.

“For clarity, every restaurant, café and bar must close all aspects of their operation, including delivery. ”

Delivery of food that is not pre-cooked will be allowed under strict health conditions. Many New Zealanders now receive their cuisine via a delivery company and are in effect no different from a supermarket delivery option.

Most people can purchase alcohol at supermarkets. On that basis, liquor stores are being treated as other non-essential retail outlets and must close. The only exception to this is Licencing Trust Areas, where there is nowhere else to purchase alcohol. These stores must operate a ‘one-in-one-out’ policy.

“We are doing further work on online ordering of non-food products for home delivery to see if this type of retail can be conducted safely. We will update advice on this once further decisions are made.

COVID-19 alert level 4 is not business as usual and means there will be significant restrictions on what New Zealanders are able to purchase. However, these changes are essential to stop the spread of the virus.

“We are ready to change the list if necessary. If we discover there are essential services that have not been made available, we will react to that as we go.”

WHAT ARE ESSENTIAL SERVICES?


  • Dairies can remain open, with a one-in-one-out rule, and cannot sell cooked food.

  • Food delivery is prohibited, except meals-on-wheels and whole-food delivery (e.g. subscription food boxes).

  • Every restaurant, café and bar must close all aspects of their operation.

  • Liquor stores must close unless they are within Licensing Trust areas (in which case they can operate with a one-in-one-out rule).

  • Self-service laundries can stay open, with two-meter physical distancing to be enforced.

  • Retirement villages are included as an essential service.

  • The Warehouse must close.

  • Bunnings, Placemakers, Mitre 10 and other retailers essential to the supply chain for building and construction can stay open to trade customers for essential purposes only.

  • The Tiwai Point smelter is exempt from closure.

  • NZ Steel is to shut down in a way that allows for production to recommence quickly.

  • Pulp and paper plants are to shut down their non-essential elements in a way that allows for production to recommence easily, and while maintaining essential production.

  • Methanex can remain in production, but at a scale consistent with the stability of gas supply.

As the lockdown rules imply, almost every business has to be closed down from the 25th of March for four weeks or more it prooves how much people rely on daily shopping anywhere to get by; but now they’re shut down, 6 days in robberies have taken place including police chases.

Crime will get worse over the next four weeks, which could imply boredom, immature people thinking they can get away from jail time & helpless shopping due to the upcoming Winter.

Winter is around the corner, stores like The Warehouse could be some of the first to be infiltrated due to crime rise, including banks & other non-essential stores like Noel Leeming.

“If crime rises, martial law could take place, and that’s not a place we want to have to go to to stay home and save lives breaking the chain of COVID-19,” said Jacinda Ardern with Mike Bush from a press conference earlier in the last couple weeks.


Last Updated: 


31


/03/20 at 6:15pm




Last Updated:

31/03/20 at 6:18pm




Last Updated:

31/03/20 at 6:42pm




Last Updated:

31/03/20 at 6:54pm




Last Updated:

2/04/20 at 9:14pm


Do you have a story? send newstips to [email protected]