New Zealand’s Timber shortage has help on the way

New Zealand’s Timber shortage has help on the way

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A new timber processing plant will be opening in Rotorua within a few weeks. It will help the current shortage.

Red Stag group CEO, Marty Verry, says the plat will add five percent capacity to the country’s wood processing sector.

“That equates to around two thousand dwelling units or most of the estimated shortfall in current timber supply,” he said.

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The plant will produce cross-laminated timber (CLT), which is referred to be a new mass timber construction of product that will be adopted worldwide. The processes include gluing layers of timber crossways over the layer below to form large panels of three, five or seven layers.

Rigid engineers panels of timber are precision cut by CNC machines in a factory to be assembled rapidly on site.

“We now have the last of the European technicians out of MIQ and doing the final commissioning of the plant. We’re going to bring forward the opening to May to help the timber shortage,” said CEO Verry.

“Costing $50 million, the CLT factory is co-located with the Southern Hemisphere’s largest sawmill, Red Stag, in Rotorua.”

“The plant will employ forty people initially, rising to double that over time, and is part-funded by a $15 million loan from the Provincial Growth Fund.”

“CLT has a value sweet spot in large-format structures, buildings of three storeys or more, and for mid-floors in terraced housing built to the NZS 3604 standard. Apartment buildings and fast-to-install CLT mid-floors will be our residential focus areas.”

The sister company for Red Stag Timber will be assisting in helping with a timber shortage.

Around 25 percent of New Zealand’s needs are mostly from an uncommitted supply from export markets which are squeezing out more hours and capacity to keep ITM, PaceMakers, Mitre10 and independent clients in the industry going.

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