‘No Food, no People’ – International Year of Fruits and Vegetables

‘No Food, no People’ – International Year of Fruits and Vegetables

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Food is important, and without it, people would not have access to fresh and healthy fruit and vegetables.

A launch of the annual International Fruits and Vegetables was a highlight being shown at Parliament on  Wednesday night.

“Access to fresh fruit and vegetable growers is essential for healthy people. What often gets forgotten is the vital role that the people who grow fruit and vegetables play in ensuring fresh fruit and vegetables are on the table,” says Horticulture New Zealand (HortNZ) Chief Executive Mike Chapman.

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“Covid has shown us that we cannot rely on imports and has highlighted how lucky we are in New Zealand that we can grow most of our own food. We need to make sure that we protect this ability.”

Growers in the industry were asked to meet increasingly strict objectives for Climate Change, including compliance in enforcing changes around the country to meet standards.

An important role is to feed people, so as a factor, the importance to continue feeding everyone is still a priority.

“If New Zealand is to meet its climate change and economic goals, growers and farmers need to be empowered to adapt and reduce emissions,” said Mr Chapman.

“The Paris Accord clearly states that producing food while adapting to climate change is vital. No food, no people. As a country, we need to grow fruit and vegetables to feed ourselves and export to earn essential overseas revenue.”

If tools are given to growers, including incentives and time, New Zealand could lead the world in Climate Change adaption.

Global production will significantly change according to research and development to find the tools and new techniques needed to make a difference for the future to come.

Image: Shutterstock.com

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